Play SLOWER! when practicing music

It's a mantra among all the best musicians I've ever known. It is a message I repeat to my students at least 40 times everyday. I say it because I care.

Here is an excellent article that breaks down why this is so crucial and yet so often ignored.
http://www.bulletproofmusician.com/is-slow-practice-really-necessary/

Play SLOWER! when practicing music. It’s a mantra among all the best musicians I’ve ever known. It is a message I repeat to my students at least 40 times everyday. I say it because I care.

Here is an excellent article that breaks down why this is so crucial and yet so often ignored.
http://www.bulletproofmusician.com/is-slow-practice-really-necessary/

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  • https://plus.google.com/114507064899637249576 lance burn

    Best advice i was given when i started learning.

  • https://plus.google.com/112521138408876587660 Kirk Rustman

    Exactly, +Rob Michael!

  • https://plus.google.com/112998434809390540078 chris mullins

    I need to try this.

  • https://plus.google.com/102632919742737793292 Mark Kidd

    And turn down/off distortion. Maskes too much.

    Btw what bpm is considered super slow? 60? 30m

  • https://plus.google.com/101465854435804471513 Rob Michael

    +Mark Kidd There is no definitive tempo. It's all relative. Think performance tempo and divide that by 10. 

  • https://plus.google.com/102632919742737793292 Mark Kidd

    So 120bpm would be 12. Isn't that no tempo at that point?

  • https://plus.google.com/102778030018789539280 Phil Wigfall

    Yep. So true. I was witness to this first hand at Berklee.  I remember it like it was yesterday…
    (Cue screen blur with arpeggiating whole tones)
    In my first week of the Fall semester at Berklee, I remember this tenor sax player who was practicing in the next room.  He was running these Michael Breckeresque licks up and down at break neck speed. They were fast, but they weren't clean, and the tone wasn't fat.  Fast forward to the end of the Spring semester, the following year.  I heard the same guy, practicing the same licks, at the same speed…and it never improved, not one iota. Not the tone, not the cleanliness, and definitely not the speed!  Breckerman wasted NINE MONTHS of practice time, and never improved once!  So, the moral of the story is: Don't be like Breckerman!  Practice slowly!

  • https://plus.google.com/101465854435804471513 Rob Michael

    Almost. Yep. +Mark Kidd 

  • https://plus.google.com/118379104848811713953 Broc Seib

    Yes, great advice. Or how to amplify my playing flaws!

  • https://plus.google.com/102632919742737793292 Mark Kidd

    Oh I have many flaws

  • https://plus.google.com/104829214191808331764 James Gabbett

    Absolutely agree. It actually doesn't take too long to play something really fast, but to play it well – that takes deliberate and conscious effort at slow speed – enunciating notes, getting the timing right, etc.

  • https://plus.google.com/112660222151755347697 Lew Bloch

    Slow, but rock steady.
    Slow, but even more musical. Slow, but even better intonation. Slow, but an even more even tone. Slow, but fully counting all the "rests" while hearing the part(s) you aren't playing. Slow, but perfectly phrased. Slow, but rock steady.

  • https://plus.google.com/113253200501799562699 Rockett Roll

    I don't know why I have such a hard time with that because I have a lot of trouble with playing fast.  That should be the big clue, eh?